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Forget-Me-Not Tinny

Back before I was a wife and mother, I used to paint and draw a LOT. It’s such a messy hobby though. And after loosing a few pieces to smudgy (but still cute) little fingers, I put my hobby on hold and found sewing to be just as rewarding. Now, in an effort to challenge myself and learn more sewing techniques I have been participating in sewing challenges and sew-alongs, etc. It’s been so much fun to try new things and see other designers creativity as well. With all that said, I was excited to come across this next one.

Project Run and Play is a sewing blog that holds regular challenges for those of us who sew kids clothes. Their  November challenge has a “Textile Manipulation” theme. The idea is to manipulate your fabric in some way (such as dying, stamping, embroidery, etc) and then create something original with it.

Painted forget-me-not tinny, before 1
This table cloth has seen better days. Tutorial for restoring vintage linens coming soon.

 

As I was searching through my stash looking for inspiration, I came across this table cloth. It’s got a blue-printed floral design that was meant to be embroidered but (sadly) never was. It occurred to me that sometimes instead of embroidery, it was almost just as popular to paint them instead. It was called “liquid embroidery” and the paint came in little tubes with a narrow tip, to be used almost like a pen. I don’t happen to have any of those, but I do have some modern-day fabric paints.  This project is the best of both worlds with painting and sewing. Here’s what I did….

So the first thing I did was cut out the piece I needed. No point in painting areas that won’t end up on the finished product.

Painted forget-me-not tinny, before 2

I used one of the scrap pieces to test how the paint would behave on my particular material. It’s always a good idea to do this before diving right in to a project to make sure you get the look you want.

Painted forget-me-not tinny, tester

I am right-handed so I started in the upper left-hand corner. That way my hand is less likely to smear the wet paint and ruin the whole thing.

Painted forget-me-not tinny, before 4
I put a paper grocery bag under my fabric to keep the paint from bleeding onto my work surface.

The base color for my forget-me-not flowers is blue, so I started with that. Once that dries, the accent colors will go on next. Forget-Me-Not flowers have a yellow center so I am using a metallic gold here and a black border for contrast. Since I’m going for an imperfect, hand-crafted look, I used an embroidery needle to paint the accents (sort of like dipping an old-fashioned pen in an ink well). It took a little longer but I love how it turned out!

Painted forget-me-not tinny, before 3
Yes, I know Forget-Me-Nots have 5 petals not 4 (but who’s counting?)

To make the dress, I used the Tinny Dress pattern from Straight Grain. I love this pattern. It has plenty of collar options to choose from to get a different look every time. This time I went with a simple peter pan collar from a vintage, silk gold-colored hankie to compliment the gold in the flowers without competing with the floral design.

Painted forget-me-not tinny
Hand-painted Forget-Me-Not Tinny Dress

I gave this dress a layered skirt from a vintage cream-colored pillowcase and white eyelet table runner on top.

Painted forget-me-not tinny, bottom
Vintage pillowcase under a vintage eyelet table runner.
Painted forget-me-not tinny, 6
My little lady <3

Painted forget-me-not tinny, 2

Painted forget-me-not tinny, 1

Painted forget-me-not tinny, 3Painted forget-me-not tinny, 4

The Tinny is supposed to have a hidden zipper but I didn’t have one. I improvised with button instead.

Painted forget-me-not tinny, 5
I tried to get a picture of the buttons but she wasn’t having it.

Painted forget-me-not tinny, 7

Painted forget-me-not tinny, 9
It’s getting chilly

Click the link below to see what others have done with the Tinny Dress.